Workout, get strong, lose fat!

For most people, fitting in a workout several times a week is just not a viable option.  And for those who are new to training, jumping onto a program that involves a complex body part split it way too much, way too soon. When starting out with resistance training, it’s usually a good idea to start with something a little more simple, that allows you to train the whole body and have an adequate number of rest days allowing your body to recuperate from the new stimulus the body is experiencing.

Generally when someone is starting a resistance program, I like to prescribe something that works the upper and lower body in the same session, and usually between 3-4 of such workouts a week. These workouts serve a dual purpose, they not only build frequency into someone’s training week, but they also allow the novice lifter to become accustomed to complex movement patterns and training stimulus, which conditioning their bodies to handle more.

Below I have outlined a simple, balanced yet effective training plan, which consists of two workouts that can be cycled between one another. This type of plan works great for someone that can only workout as little as 2 times a week, to someone who can workout up to 4 times a week, all you have to do is switch between the two workouts and make sure you get sufficient rest. The most important thing about this type of training plan is to be consistent. Keep the training the same, on the same days and for the same number of days a week, this will serve as an awesome measuring tool in weeks to come when you take into account the results you’ve been getting.

The workouts will be labelled Workout A and Workout B, if you’re only training twice a week, you’ll only do workout A and B in the week. If it’s 3 times a week, it will be Workout A, then B then back to A, the following week would be: B-A-B. And if you’re training 4 times a week, it will be A-B-A-B, keeping it the same week on week. The workouts, in order to maintain a decent level of intensity are also based around either superset or giant sets. This helps keep the workout time down while also getting in a killer workout.

 

Workout A:

A1/ Heavy Dumbbell Push Press

5 x 5

A2/ Pull Ups (assisted if needed)

5 x 5

 

 

B1/ Incline Dumbbell Bench Press

4 x 12

B2/ Barbell Upright Row (wide grip)

4 x 12

 

 

C1/ Barbell Floor Press

4 x 10

C2/ Pendlay Rows

4 x 10

 

 

D1/ Fixed Barbell Bicep Curls

3 x 12

D2/ Rope triceps push down

3 x 8

D3/ Seated lateral raise

3 x 15

 

 

 

Workout B:

A1/ Back squats

5 x 5

A2/ Front squats

5 x 5

 

B1/ Hack squat

3 x 12

B2/ Stiff legged deadlifts

3 x 15

 

C1/ Walking lunges (long stride)

3 x 12

C2/ Walking lunges (short stride)

3 x 12

C3/ Dumbbell squats

3 x 12

 

D1/ High box single leg drive

3 x 10

D2/ Curtsey Lunges

3 x 12

 

Give these workouts a go for a month and let me know how you get on in the comments section below. Although the workout isn’t periodised and doesn’t have an advanced progression model, the newbie trainee will still see great results from it by training the whole body throughout the week.

About the Author:

Own Your Fitness is a premier Personal Training and Nutritional Consultancy. Mish started his training life obese, out of shape and very unfit. Fast forward to the present day and several years of education later, he's here to provide you with an unparalleled service in the most advanced areas of training, nutrition and supplementation.
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